Oregon triathlete Mike Fisher knows importance of a good diet

Mike Fisher, a triathlete with the club team here at the University of Oregon, lives on a strict diet, but he doesn't let the nutrition aspect of the sport take control of his passion, “You should have fun. The second you lose the joy in doing something that you love is the second you should step away from it.” (Michael Shaw/Emerald)

Mike Fisher, a triathlete with the club team here at the University of Oregon, lives on a strict diet, but he doesn't let the nutrition aspect of the sport take control of his passion, “You should have fun. The second you lose the joy in doing something that you love is the second you should step away from it.” (Michael Shaw/Emerald)

Posted by Christopher Keizur on Thursday, Jan. 30 at 12:00 pm.

Michael Fisher thinks a lot about food. But, unlike his peers, he is very careful about what he eats.

Fisher is a triathlete with the club team here at the University of Oregon. He first began competing his sophomore year after friends told him to try.

“He is very dedicated,” Nick Schroeder, a friend of Fisher’s, said. “He is always out running and exercising.”

A dedication and love for sports caused him to focus in on his diet, something that is crucial for any serious athlete. Fisher stays away from all fast food. During the day, he makes sure to eat plenty so he always has energy to compete.

“He is one of the healthiest eaters I know,” Chris Gillen, Fisher’s roommate, said.

A typical day for Fisher starts off with a cup of coffee before his morning class. He then either goes back to his place or grabs something from the Duck Store for a late breakfast. A common lunch spot is Qdoba where he loves to get a burrito packed with carbs and calories. Finally at night, after working at the Student Rec Center, Fisher will make himself dinner.

Throughout the day Fisher also makes sure he drinks plenty of fluids.

“As a triathlete, if you’re not hydrated during your training you are wasting time and are probably going to hurt yourself,” Fisher said.

He also uses Gatorade and PowerBars to keep up his energy.

“For a lot of Triathletes, it is what you can ingest and feel good about,” Fisher said when asked why he chose Gatorade and PowerBars over similar products. “As high school athletes we tried the gauntlet of products; I wouldn’t say one is better than the other.”

As he approaches a race, Fisher’s entire eating schedule changes. He partakes in a tradition that his friends and family sometimes teases him over.

“If I have a race on a Saturday, from Tuesday to the day that I travel every dinner will be a ginormous bowl of pasta,” Fisher said.

He doesn’t discriminate between different types of pasta either. He will eat elbow, shell or linguini.

“It doesn’t really matter,” Fisher said. “Whatever I can get my hands on.”

He also cuts all dairy, except for chocolate milk, in the week leading up to a race.

Then when his race is finally over, Fisher allows himself to cut loose and enjoy a victory meal that also has become a tradition for him.

“I go out and I get two cheeseburger calzones from Dough Co.,” Fisher said. “I get those with ranch and hot sauce and I will destroy them as soon as I get back. That is the go-to meal.”

Though Fisher is always focused on what he puts in his body, he understands the importance in not getting too caught up with the nutrition aspect of the sport.

“You shouldn’t obsess over it,” Fisher said. “You should have fun. The second you lose the joy in doing something that you love is the second you should step away from it.”

So far Fisher hasn’t lost that joy.

Follow Chris Keizur on Twitter @chriskeizur